“I won’t Part with Komsomol, I’ll Be Always Young!”, On the 80-th Anniversary, Vladimir Alexandrovich Ivashutin! Many Happy Returns of This Day!

Vladimir Alexandrovich Ivashutin was born on October 29, 1934, the day of the 29th of October is celebrated in Russia as the day of birth of Komsomol (Association of Younger Generation of the Russian people) of the country. Which is why sounds for V.A. Ivashutin the famous Russian song:  Iosif Kobzon- “I won’t Part with… Continue reading “I won’t Part with Komsomol, I’ll Be Always Young!”, On the 80-th Anniversary, Vladimir Alexandrovich Ivashutin! Many Happy Returns of This Day!

Murakami, “Kafka on the Shore”, translated from the Japanese by Philip Gabriel, Vintage Books, London, 2005 (An Opinion)

“Kafka on the Shore” is classic Murakami. The story is rich in references to music and Western culture, dreamy sceneries that expose the spooky underbelly of ordinary life, utterly unadorned language, and elements of magical realism that challenge the reader’s grasp of reality. Murakami’s intention was to write a story about a boy who escapes… Continue reading Murakami, “Kafka on the Shore”, translated from the Japanese by Philip Gabriel, Vintage Books, London, 2005 (An Opinion)

“Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman” by Haruki Murakami, translated by Jay Rubin and Philip Gabriel, Vintage Books, London, 2007. (A Review)

After summer trip to Japan, I was smashed by the incomparable Japanese author Haruki Murakami. Murakami’s world is one of imagination. In his world, he can make mundane seem surreal and the surreal seem mundane. But I think there is an echo of longing and loneliness in his work. “The year of Spaghetti” is in… Continue reading “Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman” by Haruki Murakami, translated by Jay Rubin and Philip Gabriel, Vintage Books, London, 2007. (A Review)